10th Annual Adirondack Habitat Awareness Day
d-Tailed Hawk Wolves Ravens
Raptors Rehab Refuge
  10th Annual Adirondack habitat Awareness Day
AHA Day 2017 Agenda

10th Annual Adirondack Habitat Awareness Day

Why are the Adirondacks experiencing greater swings in extreme weather events, such as heavier thunderstorm activity interspersed with longer periods of drought? Why are we experiencing more flooding and landslides? How does the average increase in Winter temperature, and the narrowing range of snow dates, affect Adirondack Wildlife and Vegetation? 

On Sunday, September 3rd, Adirondack Wildlife Refuge will host their 10th annual Habitat Awareness Day, from 10 am to 4 pm. The theme this year will be Wildlife Habitat Challenges. Keynote speaker will be 2013’s New York State Professor of the Year, Curt Stager of Paul Smith’s College, author of “Deep Future” and many other books and studies. Come hear Curt, along with other local nature authorities, observers, rehabbers and the college interns working at Adirondack Wildlife, discuss what they’re seeing and learning, on the ground, working in the Adirondack region. 

How does the increase in Summer droughts affect black bears, like Barnabee Bear, the sow who survived serious starvation and mange last September, was successfully rehabbed by Adirondack Wildlife, and ended up giving birth to her two cubs in January, before being released with them in May?
 
Why are moose in trouble all along the eastern US-Canadian border, and how is that related to increasing temperatures and diminishing snowfall? Why are animals like black vultures, normally native in much warmer climates, taking up residence here? Why are the endangered Bicknell’s thrushes, experiencing territory invasion by other thrushes?
 
 We are all accustomed to competing media pundits cherry picking questionable data claims, while studiously avoiding discussing the wildlife and climate experiences of specific regions, such as the Adirondacks, or even the Northeast generally.
 
Do the questions posed above reflect naturally occurring changes, or are they signals that there is something more significant happening which may affect us all? Should we be reframing the discussion around local events and trends we’re all familiar with, even as we struggle to connect the dots between these developments? How do we distinguish natural changes from those partially or heavily influenced by human activity, and In the case of the latter, is there anything we can do to mitigate their impact? 

On September 3rd, you will also meet and learn about gray wolves, black bears, coyotes, fox, bobcat, eagles, along with other birds of prey, such as any hawk, falcon or owl you’ll find in the Adirondacks. Come help us celebrate the opening of the new, indoor Adirondack Wildlife Refuge Education Center.

For more information, call 855-Wolf-Man, 518-946-1197, or visit our web page at www.AdirondackWildlife.org. Admission is free, but any donations will be greatly accepted, and will enable Adirondack Wildlife to continue its ongoing mission of rescue, rehab and release of Adirondack Wildlife.

 


Curt Stager Home Page

Wolves of Isle Royale National Park

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layman's intro to the moose


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Photographs from Adirondack Habitat Awareness Day

Contact Information
Adirondack Wildlife
Steve & Wendy Hall
PO Box 360, 977 Springfield Road, Wilmington, NY 12997
Toll Free: 855-Wolf-Man (855-965-3626)
Cell Phone: 914-715-7620
Office Phone 2: 518-946-2428
Fax: 518-536-9015
Email us: info@AdirondackWildlife.org